THE MĀori ECONOMY

Māori have a long history in international trade. 

Today, the Māori economy includes a range of authorities, businesses, and employers. Māori own a significant proportion of assets in the primary sectors – 50% of the fishing quota, 40% forestry, 30% lamb production, 30% sheep and beef production, 10% dairy production and 10% kiwifruit production. Products from these sectors typically face the highest tariffs in our export markets. 

The Māori economy is also diversifying with new investment areas, including geothermal, digital, services, education, tourism and housing. The estimated value of the Māori asset base is over $50 billion.

The increase of wealth in the Asia-Pacific is creating further opportunities for the Māori economy. Culture, family, and whakapapa are important in these regions, making Māori well placed to connect.

ENSURING MĀORI PROSPERITY IS ON THE INTERNATIONAL TRADE AGENDA

Our Māori asset base is worth 50 billion dollars and we have contributed 12 billion to New Zealand’s GDP.

In the longer-term, businesses operating with collectively owned assets like Māori have lower leverage ratios than their industry counterparts. Lower leverage brings greater resilience to economic shocks and longer-term sustainability.

This means, in the longer-term, Māori businesses with collectively owned assets can have a stabilising effect on the New Zealand economy as a whole.

– Adrian Orr, Governor of New Zealand Reserve Bank

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